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28
May
2017

Comparing The Eurovision 2017 Semi Final Scores And Rankings

Comparing The Eurovision 2017 Semi Final Scores And Rankings

The dust has settled. The crew have packed up and left. And 41 delegations have gone home; some elated, others deflated. The bulk of the competitors in this year’s Grand Final had to earn their slot through a semi-final. Let’s take a look at some of the more interesting outcomes.

There were 18 songs competing in each semi-final and half of the prequalified countries’ juries and public also voted on who should qualify. Therefore, when crunching numbers from the semi-finals, the maximum component score for each delegation is 240 points: 20 delegations (you cannot vote for yourself) times 12 points. Or a maximum of 480 points when combining both score components.

Semi-Final One

Portugal clearly won the first semi-final and topped both score components. Their televote total was 197 points, receiving points from every country and 82 per cent of the televote points on offer. Average televote score of 9.85 points. Nine countries awarded their televote douze points to Portugal. Salvador’s Sobral jury support was not quite as strong as his televote support: 173 points, 72 per cent of the maximum jury score available. Seven juries awarded Amar Pelos Dois the maximum douze points. Every jury gave points to Portugal.

Aside from Portugal, however, there was little agreement between the public and juries: only five other entries (Moldova, Sweden, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Greece) were in both top 10 lists. And the ordinal rankings were mostly rather different too:

PlaceTelevotingJuryCombined
1 Portugal Portugal Portugal
2 Moldova Australia Moldova
3 Belgium Sweden Sweden
4 Sweden Moldova Belgium
5 Cyprus Azerbaijan Cyprus
6 Poland Armenia Australia
7 Armenia Czechia Armenia
8 Azerbaijan Georgia Azerbaijan
9 Greece Greece Poland
10 Finland Cyprus Greece
11 Montenegro Poland Georgia
12 Albania Finland Finland
13 Georgia Belgium Czechia
14 Iceland Albania Albania
15 Australia Iceland Iceland
16 Slovenia Montenegro Montenegro
17 Latvia Slovenia Slovenia
18 Czechia Latvia Latvia

Source: Wikipedia.

Moldova was 2nd with the public and 4th with the juries and 2nd overall. Sweden was 4th with the public and 3rd with the juries and 3rd overall).  Armenia was 7th with the public and 6th with juries and 7th overall. After that it gets a bit messy. Azerbaijan was 8th with the public and 5th with juries and 8th overall: Greece was 9th with both the public and juries and finished 10th overall. And there was the heartbreak of Finland: 10th with televoters and 12th with juries, but their combined scores were only 12th highest. Remember: it is the scores that matters, not the rankings of each score component.

(Source: YouTube/Eurovision)

We also required two tie-breaks for this semi-final. (Un)Friendly neighbours Azerbaijan and Armenia had the same juries score, 87 points. Both also received a single douze points; however, Azerbaijan is ranked ahead of Armenia because Skeletons earned points from 15 countries. Fly With Me earned points from 14 countries. Cyprus and Sweden both earned 103 televote points, but Sweden’s two douze points trumped Cyprus’s one.

Semi-Final Two

Bulgaria’s victory was wholly unambiguous. Beautiful Mess rocked the televote for 208 points, receiving points from every country and 87 per cent of the televote points on offer, for an average televote score of 10.4 points! Kristian Kostov received douze points from nine countries. Bulgaria’s jury support was nearly identical: 199 points with no jury awarding Beautiful Mess less than 6 points. Nine juries gave Bulgaria their douze points. It’s a remarkably high and consistent result.

Aside from Bulgaria, however, there was little agreement between the public and juries: only five other entries (Belarus, Hungary, Israel, Norway and the Netherlands) were in both top 10 lists:

PlaceTelevotingJuryCombined
1 Bulgaria Bulgaria Bulgaria
2 Hungary Netherlands Hungary
3 Romania Norway Israel
4 Israel Austria Netherlands
5 Croatia Denmark Norway
6 Estonia Israel Romania
7 Belarus Hungary Austria
8 Norway Malta Croatia
9 Netherlands Belarus Belarus
10  Switzerland Serbia Denmark
11 Serbia  Switzerland Serbia
12 Ireland Ireland  Switzerland
13 Macedonia Croatia Ireland
14 Austria Macedonia Estonia
15 Lithuania Romania Macedonia
16 Denmark Lithuania Malta
17 San Marino Estonia Lithuania
18 Malta San Marino San Marino

Source: Wikipedia.

Hungary was second with the public and 7th with juries for second overall. Israel was fourth with the public and 6th with juries for third overall. The Netherlands with only 9th with the public but second with juries for fourth overall. Norway were 8th with the public and third with the juries for fifth overall. Finally, Belarus was seventh with the public and ninth with juries for 9th overall.

(Source: YouTube/Eurovision)

Then it gets a lot messier. Denmark only scored 5 televote points (16th place) but their 96 jury points (fifth place) snuck them in at 10th overall. Estonia  were sixth in the televote (69 points) but 17th with juries (16 points): they ended up 14th overall.

And we had double ouches too. Malta got zero in the televote: even 8th place with juries could not save ‘Breathlessly’. San Marino got nul in jury support and a sole televote point from Germany (the Ralph Siegel effect?).

The Take-Aways

Nine of the top 10 Grand Finalists were qualifiers: Italy (6th overall) was the only pre-qualified entry in the top 10. Four came from the first semi-final, five from the second. Australia was only 6th in the first semi-final, but managed 9th in the Grand Final—in both instances thanks to massive jury support. In the second semi-final Norway was 6th and Romania 7th: in the Grand Final Romania were 7th and Norway 10th—mostly because Romania racked up massive televote scores in both the semi-final (148 points compared to Norway’s 52) and Grand Final (224 for ‘Yodel It’ versus 29 for ‘Grab the Moment’).

(Source: YouTube/Orange Fresh)

Cyprus’s semi-final support level collapsed: from 168 points (103 public and 65 juries) to 68 points (32 public and  36 juries). It shows how much more competitive Grand Finals are compared to semi-finals. Similarly the Netherlands 200 semi-final points (51 public and 149 juries) dropped to 150 points (15 public and 135 juries). In other words, O’G3NE held on to more of their jury support: Hovig saw larger drops in both components.

When the jury and televote scored were synthesized to create a top 10 from each delegation, songs with skewed support either from juries or the public tended to get flattened scores—sometimes ending up with no points despite winning a televote. This current system treats both the public and jury score components equally. Some argue this rewards safe or unremarkable entries: I would argue that this precludes juror sniffiness to trump public appreciation.

Categories: ESC Insight

28
May
2017

Aftermath 2017 (9): Croatia only Yugoslavian nation in the final

Aftermath 2017 (9): Croatia only Yugoslavian nation in the final

In the upcoming days, we take a look at the aftermath of the Eurovision Song Contest 2017. This episode is about the countries of former Yugoslavia, that almost all missed out on a place in the final. Except Croatia’s Jacques Houdek.

What happened to the countries from former Yugoslavia, that used to be real forces in Eurovision about ten years ago. In 2017, only Croatia’s song ‘My Friend’ was in the final. And that entry also failed to make it to the top 10, to much disappointment for Jacques Houdek.

The Aftermath

In a post on his Facebook page, Houdek elaborated on his theory that the juries from the former Yugoslavia were bitter about Croatia being the only nation to qualify for the Grand Final. “The success could have been bigger. The lack of support of the ‘expert’ judges of neighbouring countries is really shameful. Unfortunately there was bitterness I suppose because Croatia was the only one from the region in the grand final.”

The good news is that this story debunks a solid Eurovision myth. Block voting or neighbour voting… It does not exist, especially not with the juries. Out of the televoting block, only Slovenia and Montenegro gave “My Friend” 12 points, F.Y.R Macedonia’s televoters gave it 10.

Slovenia, FYR Macedonia (again) and Montenegro did not make the final by far. Serbia got really close, missing out on a couple of points to Denmark. Still, broadcaster RTS are no sore losers and already confirmed to take part again in Lisbon!

It was a great show. See you next year! 🇷🇸

— RTS | Serbia ESC (@SerbiaESC) May 11, 2017

Categories: ESC Daily

28
May
2017

Eurovision Semi-Finals 2017: Scores versus Rankings

The dust has settled. The crew have packed up and left. And 41 delegations have gone home; some elated, others deflated. The bulk of the competitors in this year’s Grand Final had to earn their slot through a semi-final. Let’s take a look at some of the more interesting outcomes.

There were 18 songs competing in each semi-final and half of the prequalified countries’ juries and public also voted on who should qualify. Therefore, when crunching numbers from the semi-finals, the maximum component score for each delegation is 240 points: 20 delegations (you cannot vote for yourself) times 12 points. Or a maximum of 480 points when combining both score components.

Semi-Final One

Portugal clearly won the first semi-final and topped both score components. Their televote total was 197 points, receiving points from every country and 82 per cent of the televote points on offer. Average televote score of 9.85 points. Nine countries awarded their televote douze points to Portugal. Salvador’s Sobral jury support was not quite as strong as his televote support: 173 points, 72 per cent of the maximum jury score available. Seven juries awarded Amar Pelos Dois the maximum douze points. Every jury gave points to Portugal.

Aside from Portugal, however, there was little agreement between the public and juries: only five other entries (Moldova, Sweden, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Greece) were in both top 10 lists. And the ordinal rankings were mostly rather different too:

PlaceTelevotingJuryCombined
1 Portugal Portugal Portugal
2 Moldova Australia Moldova
3 Belgium Sweden Sweden
4 Sweden Moldova Belgium
5 Cyprus Azerbaijan Cyprus
6 Poland Armenia Australia
7 Armenia Czechia Armenia
8 Azerbaijan Georgia Azerbaijan
9 Greece Greece Poland
10 Finland Cyprus Greece
11 Montenegro Poland Georgia
12 Albania Finland Finland
13 Georgia Belgium Czechia
14 Iceland Albania Albania
15 Australia Iceland Iceland
16 Slovenia Montenegro Montenegro
17 Latvia Slovenia Slovenia
18 Czechia Latvia Latvia

Source: Wikipedia

Moldova was 2nd with the public and 4th with the juries and 2nd overall. Sweden was 4th with the public and 3rd with the juries and 3rd overall).  Armenia was 7th with the public and 6th with juries and 7th overall. After that it gets a bit messy. Azerbaijan was 8th with the public and 5th with juries and 8th overall: Greece was 9th with both the public and juries and finished 10th overall. And there was the heartbreak of Finland: 10th with televoters and 12th with juries, but their combined scores were only 12th highest. Remember: it is the scores that matters, not the rankings of each score component.

(Source: YouTube/Eurovision)

We also required two tie-breaks for this semi-final. (Un)Friendly neighbours Azerbaijan and Armenia had the same juries score, 87 points. Both also received a single douze points; however, Azerbaijan is ranked ahead of Armenia because Skeletons earned points from 15 countries. Fly With Me earned points from 14 countries. Cyprus and Sweden both earned 103 televote points, but Sweden’s two douze points trumped Cyprus’s one.

Semi-Final Two

Bulgaria’s victory was wholly unambiguous. Beautiful Mess rocked the televote for 208 points, receiving points from every country and 87 per cent of the televote points on offer, for an average televote score of 10.4 points! Kristian Kostov received douze points from nine countries. Bulgaria’s jury support was nearly identical: 199 points with no jury awarding Beautiful Mess less than 6 points. Nine juries gave Bulgaria their douze points. It’s a remarkably high and consistent result.

Aside from Bulgaria, however, there was little agreement between the public and juries: only five other entries (Belarus, Hungary, Israel, Norway and the Netherlands) were in both top 10 lists:

PlaceTelevotingJuryCombined
1 Bulgaria Bulgaria Bulgaria
2 Hungary Netherlands Hungary
3 Romania Norway Israel
4 Israel Austria Netherlands
5 Croatia Denmark Norway
6 Estonia Israel Romania
7 Belarus Hungary Austria
8 Norway Malta Croatia
9 Netherlands Belarus Belarus
10  Switzerland Serbia Denmark
11 Serbia  Switzerland Serbia
12 Ireland Ireland  Switzerland
13 Macedonia Croatia Ireland
14 Austria Macedonia Estonia
15 Lithuania Romania Macedonia
16 Denmark Lithuania Malta
17 San Marino Estonia Lithuania
18 Malta San Marino San Marino

Source: Wikipedia

Hungary was second with the public and 7th with juries for second overall. Israel was fourth with the public and 6th with juries for third overall. The Netherlands with only 9th with the public but second with juries for fourth overall. Norway were 8th with the public and third with the juries for fifth overall. Finally, Belarus was seventh with the public and ninth with juries for 9th overall.

(Source: YouTube/Eurovision)

Then it gets a lot messier. Denmark only scored 5 televote points (16th place) but their 96 jury points (fifth place) snuck them in at 10th overall. Estonia  were sixth in the televote (69 points) but 17th with juries (16 points): they ended up 14th overall.

And we had double ouches too. Malta got zero in the televote: even 8th place with juries could not save Breathlessly. San Marino got nul in jury support and a sole televote point from Germany (the Ralph Siegel effect?).

The Take-Aways

Nine of the top 10 Grand Finalists were qualifiers: Italy (6th overall) was the only pre-qualified entry in the top 10. Four came from the first semi-final, five from the second. Australia was only 6th in the first semi-final, but managed 9th in the Grand Final—in both instances thanks to massive jury support. In the second semi-final Norway was 6th and Romania 7th: in the Grand Final Romania were 7th and Norway 10thmostly because Romania racked up massive televote scores in both the semi-final (148 points compared to Norway’s 52) and Grand Final (224 for Yodel It versus 29 for Grab the Moment).

(Source: YouTube/Orange Fresh)

Cyprus’s semi-final support level collapsed: from 168 points (103 public and 65 juries) to 68 points (32 public and  36 juries). It shows how much more competitive Grand Finals are compared to semi-finals. Similarly the Netherlands 200 semi-final points (51 public and 149 juries) dropped to 150 points (15 public and 135 juries). In other words, O’G3NE held on to more of their jury support: Hovig saw larger drops in both components.

When the jury and televote scored were synthesized to create a top 10 from each delegation, songs with skewed support either from juries or the public tended to get flattened scores—sometimes ending up with no points despite winning a televote. This current system treats both the public and jury score components equally. Some argue this rewards safe or unremarkable entries: I would argue that this precludes juror sniffiness to trump public appreciation.

Categories: ESC Insight

27
May
2017

Slavko Kalezić: “I am a spiritual leader!”

Slavko Kalezić: “I am a spiritual leader!”

Slavko Kalezić (Montenegro 2017)

Slavko Kalezić has high thoughts about his own achievements in Kyiv, especially in the field of fashion and staging despite winning the Barbara Dex award. Furthermore Slavko defines himself as Montenegro’s spiritual leader.

A couple of days ago, Slavko Kalezić was a guest on RTCG’s (Radio and Television Montenegro) morning show, where he talked about his impressions from Ukraine.

Among other things Slavko said that he made a fashion revolution at Eurovision this year. The singer explained that he was helping fashion designer Marina Banović in creating his outfit for the contest. This statement comes few days after he won an unofficial award as worst dressed at the Eurovision Song Contest, the Barbara Dex award.

Without false modesty, I can say that the star of this year’s contest was Montenegro’s representative Slavko Kalezić. When I look back at what happened in Kyiv it still feels like a dream to me“, Slavko said in the morning show.

There is no doubt, that Slavko is very confident in himself. Expect exposing his skills as a fashion designer, Slavko also believes that he was one man responsible for carrying out his country’s Eurovision project.

Every country has problems. I am an educated man, and I know how the system is functioning. The Eurovision project is a state project, which needs support from the people. I would like to thank to all delegation members, but I was the one who carried out this project. I was a point man.

Slavko also commented on the much negative critics about his performance in Kyiv. The singer explained that his primary task though was to create a show. Slavko said that he had a fever up to 38.5 Celcius on the semi-final evening, and that he wasn’t the only artist, who sang false in the competition.

See alsoSlavko Kalezić writes book about Eurovision experience

Overall Slavko made it clear that he doesn’t care about the negative comments and that he doesn’t have time for it. Actually he pictures himself as his country’s spiritual leader:

I stood up for my nation and my country as a spiritual leader does. It is enough to say that I experienced how children came to me, after I went back to my country, and told me, that I was their idol.

In the video below you can watch Slavko Kalezić’s in a 4K performance from Kyiv, where he finished 16th with 56 points in the first semi-final:

Categories: Eurovisionary

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