22
June
2017

France announces open auditions for Eurovision 2018

France announces open auditions for Eurovision 2018

After two years with internal selections by France 2 for the Eurovision Song Contest, the French broadcaster, in collaboration with ITV Studios France is launching an open casting to select their next representative.

After Amir and Alma, in 2016 and 2017 respectively, France has decided to give the public the choice of who will be selected to represent France at the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest in Lisbon.

Not a lot of details have been revealed yet, but the French broadcaster announced an exclusive singing contest open to all. The contest will be produced by ITV Studios France, which is known to produce shows such as The Voice.

The contest is open to song writers, composers and singers.

Some of the rules listed on the application website:

  • The song must be unreleased as of September 1st, 2017
  • No commercial lyrics. It cannot have been published on social media either, however it can be an already registered song with SACEM (The Society of Authors, Composers and Publishers of Music).
  • A maximum of 6 singers (lead or backing vocals)
  • There can only be 4 song-writers/composers
  • The song must be at least 70% with French lyrics
  • The song-writers/composers will need to register or already be registered with SACEM.

A note also mentions that since the song will need to be performed live, the arrangements of the song must keep that aspect in mind.

Keep following EuroVisionary as we’ll reveal more of the details as they become known.

For more info and register follow the link to the French page about it.

And check out the promo for the selection below:

Categories: Eurovisionary

22
June
2017

France: First plans for national final revealed

France: First plans for national final revealed

French broadcaster France 2 has released the first information for their plans for the Eurovision Song Contest 2018. France will return to a national final format.

Right after Eurovision 2017, where France got a 12th place with Alma, the rumour went around that France was not going to have an internal selection the next year. There seem to be some big plans for a huge national final, in the style of Melodifestivalen with preselection rounds in several cities. If that will indeed be the case is still unsure, but there will indeed be a public selection, as confirmed in this video below:

Interested participants can apply on the website of the French broadcaster. Their songs have to be in French for 70%.

Categories: ESC Daily

21
June
2017

Eurovision seen through the eyes of children

Eurovision seen through the eyes of children

Måns Zelmerlöw and a children's choir doing the opening act of the First Semi-final in 2016.

Is Eurovision the same through the eyes of young fans? Europe’s favourite song contest enjoys great popularity among a wide demographic but you don’t often hear what its younger fans think. We thought we would ask schoolchildren themselves for a first-hand opinion.

What is Eurovision? Eurovision is a contest that was first made to unite Europe again from war through the power of music. It involves singers from different countries – some with beautiful and powerful ballads, some with energetic pop songs, and others give you the ‘what was that?’ feeling. But is it the same through the eyes of a child? What goes on in their heads when they watch Eurovision? We have interviewed some children from schools in Longford, Ireland, asking them some questions about what they think about the contest.

What do you think about the Eurovision Song Contest?

Emily Bonsu (eleven years old): ‘Well, it is a little strange. It is awesome to watch because it’s fun, but some acts are awkward, but, mostly, the fun kind of awkward. And the costumes! Sometimes the costumes are a bit over the top. But, overall, it’s a really good show.’

Austeja Marcinonyte (twelve years old): ‘It’s so cool! I love watching it. And the songs are so awesome. I think it’s amazing!’

What song is your favourite from this year’s Eurovision Song Contest?

Oliwia Sierotnik (thirteen years old): I loved Hungary this year. It’s so catchy, and I love the Hungarian language – and I love the country. I loved the chorus.’

Emily Bonsu (eleven years old): At first, I really liked France’s song, but, after time, Bulgaria became my favourite. Bulgaria is such a good song, I am glad it came second. Well deserved.’

Kitija Vucena (fifteen years old):I have a bunch of favourites. Italy, for example. Oh, he looks like such a fun guy to be with. It looks as if you’d never be bored having him by your side. The song is awesome, I love to sing in Italian. Bulgaria is really good, and he’s so young. He has an amazing voice being only seventeen years old. I love the guy from Montenegro – Slavko Kalezic – he is such a diva. Too bad he didn’t qualify. The song was so fun and exciting on stage – well done, Montenegro.”

Austeja Marcinonyte (twelve years old): ‘I love Bulgaria – it’s so good – it’s slow, yet has an awesome beat. Bulgaria could have easily won.’

Do you like this year’s winner?

Emily Bonsu (eleven years old): Yes, I do. It wasn’t the country I was voting for, but I guess it wasn’t too bad. And the song is nice. Well done, Portugal.’

Oliwia Sierotnik (thirteen years old):‘Well … I guess someone else could have won. Portugal’s song is a very slow ballad, and I don’t really go for those songs … but it’s nice. I’m happy for Portugal.’

Kitija Vucena (fifteen years old):‘It is a very moving song with a moving message, but I think a more energetic song would be more ideal for Eurovision. I’d like to see what Portugal puts up next year.’

What would you change if you could?

Kitija Vucena (fifteen years old): I would like to change the new voting system, and get the old one back. I love the eight, ten and twelve points, I prefer it than giving a big amount of points all at once to each country, because, if we use the new voting system, then anyone can win.’

Emily Bonsu (eleven years old): ‘I would make it less political. For example, why does Albania always have to give their twelve points to Italy? I know it’s to do with neighbouring countries, but I would make it so that everybody would vote for the countries they actually like.’

Why does Ireland keep getting it wrong at Eurovision?

Emily Bonsu (eleven years old):‘Well, I wouldn’t say they get it all wrong. Some songs are good, and they’re not completely terrible. This year’s entry wasn’t my cup of tea – but it wasn’t too bad either. But it didn’t qualify anyways, so that doesn’t matter. Well, Ireland hasn’t won Eurovision since twenty years or so, but I guess it’s because they don’t pick the right people. I think a pop song could make Ireland win the contest again. Something that sounds like the songs that hit the top charts nowadays. Something that sounds like Justin Bieber’s songs. So, if they enter such a song at Eurovision in 2018, I am sure they will get their eighth victory.’

Oliwia Sierotnik (thirteen years old): Maybe they’re tired of winning? I mean, they won seven times, right? Or maybe they don’t know where they would host it if the show took place in Ireland? I don’t know, honestly. I guess a strong pop song would do it. Maybe like Bulgaria’s entry this year. Or maybe Hungary’s. A song like that will do!’

Alanna Foley (twelve years old): Ireland does very badly at Eurovision, and I almost never really like the song they send to Eurovision, but I did like Jedward’s entries. But why does Ireland never win Eurovision anymore? I guess Ireland doesn’t want to win? Or maybe they want to let someone else win? Or maybe they’re focusing on something else? Well, I think, if Jedward represented Ireland again, I think they could win.’

What is your favourite Eurovision winner?

Kitija Vucena (fifteen years old): ‘Definitely Mans Zelmerlow, who represented Sweden in 2015. He is so handsome and talented. And I love the song. “Heroes” is such an amazing song with an amazing message.’

Emily Bonsu (eleven years old): ‘I love the winner in 2004 – Ruslana with her song Wild Dances – it’s so fun to sing.’

Alanna Foley (twelve years old): I don’t really have a favourite – each winner is really good. But I have many favourite entries that unfortunately did not win. Like. for example, I like Dum Tek Tek (Turkey 2009), and, of course, I love Jedward.’

Thank you for reading this article! Do you agree with what these students are saying about Eurovision? Leave your comments down below!

Categories: Eurovisionary

20
June
2017

Helena Paparizou and Tamta goes Sanremo on new duet

Helena Paparizou and Tamta goes Sanremo on new duet

Helena Paparizou and Tamta in a collaboration. That is a dream coming true for many Greek fans, and now it happens. On Helena’s new album is a duet of an Italian Sanremo entry. The Greek cover is called Tora I Pote (Now or Never).

Helena Paparizou is the only winner for Greece at the Eurovision Song Contest, while Tamta is a very popular artist that almost every year is speculated as a candidate to represent the country. In 2007, she participated in the Greek national final and in 2015 she missed the deadline to submit an entry, Unloved, which she then released a few days later.

The two popular ladies are joining forces for the first time in a duet which will be released in the next few days on Helena’s new digital album. The song is a cover of Dolcenera’s entry in Sanremo 2016, Ora O Mai Piu. Stavros Stavrou wrote the Greek lyrics to the Greek version Tora I Pote. The album is expected to be released in the following days.

While waiting for the Greek version, you can watch Dolcenera’s Ora O Mai Piu in the video below:

Categories: Eurovisionary

20
June
2017

Eurovision Insight Podcast: By Royal Appointment

Eurovision Insight Podcast: By Royal Appointment
http://archive.org/download/escinsight_20170619_493/escinsight_20170619_493.mp3

With a bit of The Voice Kids and Britain’s Got Talent, a Russian National Final, and an opportunity to enjoy the process, the ESC Insight podcast rounds up where we stand for Eurovision 2018 and Junior Eurovision 2017.

Eurovision Insight Podcast: By Royal Appointment

The latest news on Junior Eurovision 2017 and Eurovision 2018, along with an MBE and music from Sandra Reemer. Hosted by Ewan Spence.

Keep listening to the ESC Insight podcast over the summer for more Eurovision news, fun, and chat. You’ll find the show in iTunes, and a direct RSS feed is also available. We also have a regular email newsletter which you can sign up to here.

Categories: ESC Insight

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