07
October
2017

Greek final 2018 – Idol winner Panagiotis Tsakalakos to enter the race (update)

Greek final 2018 – Idol winner Panagiotis Tsakalakos to enter the race (update)

Panagiotis Tsakalos was the winner of Greek Idol 2011

It has been reported that Panagiotis Tsakalakos, winner of the second season of Greek Idol, is in talks with the Greek public broadcaster for its 2018 Eurovision national final.

As reported earlier, the Greek public broadcaster ERT has already contacted record labels asking for entries and talent regarding its plans for a 2018 Eurovision national final.

After folk musician Areti Katime, it was revealed today that Panagiotis Tsakalakos is in talks about submitting an entry for the consideration of ERT.

Born in the USA, Panagiotis shot to fame after participating and winning the second season of talent show Greek Idol in 2011. With 53.8% of the vote, his was somewhat of a surprise win over runner-up Malou Kiriakopoulou that had caused a sensation at the time.

Having done postgraduate studies in music, the artist is also an accomplished guitar player. He has so far released three singles and his musical style can be described as alternative pop/rock.

See alsoGreece update – 2018 Eurovision entry to be 'exclusively' in Greek

Update – it was earlier reported that Panagiotis had already submitted a song to the ERT. According to his own statement just released however, the singer is still in talks with the Greek public broadcaster.

The truth is that we are in talks with the ERT regarding our participation in the Greek national final for Eurovision, without our entry having been submitted yet. The song with which we are participating is completely different to our to date entries in the event, with ethnic elements, and I reckon that it would offer very good chances for a high place for Greece in this year’s Eurovision. I cannot wait for you to hear it!

Panagiotis Tsakalakos

The deadline for submitting songs to the Greek broadcaster is 20th October. Songs will have to be sung entirely in Greek and preferably contain Greek musical elements.

Below, you can watch Panagiotis Tsakalakos’ music video for 2012 single Tha Me Vreis (You Will Find Me).

Categories: Eurovisionary

07
October
2017

Greek final 2018 – Idol winner Panagiotis Tsakalakos enters the race

Greek final 2018 – Idol winner Panagiotis Tsakalakos enters the race

Panagiotis Tsakalos was the winner of Greek Idol 2011

It has been reported that Panagiotis Tsakalakos, winner of the second season of Greek Idol, has submitted a song to the Greek public broadcaster for its 2018 Eurovision national final.

As reported earlier, the Greek public broadcaster ERT has already contacted record labels asking for entries and talent regarding its plans for a 2018 Eurovision national final.

After folk musician Areti Katime, it was revealed today that Panagiotis Tsakalakos has also submitted an entry for the consideration of ERT.

Born in the USA, Panagiotis shot to fame after participating and winning the second season of talent show Greek Idol in 2011. With 53.8% of the vote, his was somewhat of a surprise win over runner-up Malou Kiriakopoulou that had caused a sensation at the time.

Having done postgraduate studies in music, the artist is also an accomplished guitar player. He has so far released three singles and his musical style can be described as alternative pop/rock. Panagiotis will be representing the label Oxygen Music.

See alsoGreece update – 2018 Eurovision entry to be 'exclusively' in Greek

The deadline for submitting songs to the Greek broadcaster is 20th October. Songs will have to be sung entirely in Greek and preferably contain Greek musical elements.

Below, you can watch Panagiotis Tsakalakos’ music video for 2012 single Tha Me Vreis (You Will Find Me).

Categories: Eurovisionary

07
October
2017

OGAE SPAIN CONGRESS 2017: LIVE FROM MADRID

25 mins ago

12th spanish ogae Congress Online today #oikotimes #spain #eurovision #melfest #ogae #song #contest #esc #congress

A post shared by OIKOTIMES EUROVISION (@oikotimes) on

Categories: Oiko Times

06
October
2017

Sobral tops the list for heart transplant

PORTUGAL – As of Septmeber 9th, Eurovision 2017 winner is in the hospital, addmitted as in critical condition and in level of urgency 2 according to Manuael Antunes, director of heart plant surgery at the hospital where Salvador is located at the moment.

There are 39 people in the waiting list for heart transplant in the country but there seems to consider also another solution for Salvador such as an artificial heart which can help the singer to pass throw the cardiac problem.

The 27 year old singer also has blood type B which is a rare blood type and needs a donor with the same or O negative type. This is what makes his case urgent and made him also top the list for the heart transplant.

It is also explained by the the doctors that his heart problem can cause other organs to be damaged therefore the solution of an artificial heart should be seriously considered. It is also explained that finding a heart definitely needs the right blood type but also needs to take into consideration the person from which the heart is deriving.

You cannot put a car engine into a truck, nor a heart of a 50kg woman to a 80kg man. It is very complicated.

Categories: Oiko Times

06
October
2017

Junior Eurovision: Stage for contest in Tbilisi revealed

Junior Eurovision: Stage for contest in Tbilisi revealed

The 2017 Junior Eurovision Song Contest takes place next month and this week saw the Heads of Delegation meet in the Georgian capital Tbilisi. During the meeting the first pictures of the stage were also revealed.

Sixteen countries will take part in the 15th edition of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest this year, including Australia. Portugal returns to the contest, for the first time since 2007. The contest will take place in the Olympic Palace in Tbilisi, Georgia on Sunday 26th November 2017 at 16:00 CET.

This is the line-up for the contest so far.

Albania
Armenia – Misha
Australia – Isabella Clarke – Speak Up
Belarus – Helena Meraai – I Am The One
Cyprus – Nicole Nicolaou – I Wanna Be S Star
FYR Macedonia – Mina Blazev – Dancing Through Life
Georgia – Grigol Kipshidze
Ireland
Italy – Maria Iside Fiore – Scelgo (My Choice)
Malta – Gianluca Cilia – Dawra Tond
Poland – Alicja Rega – Mój dom
Portugal – Mariana Venâncio – Youtuber
Russia – Polina Bogusevich – Wings
Serbia – Irina Brodic & Jana Paunovic – Ceo svet je naš
The Netherlands – Fource – Love Me
Ukraine – Anastasiya Baginska – Don’t Stop

Another change to the voting procedure

There has been a change in the voting rules again this year. The audience will be able to vote online, which opens on Friday 24th November, and will close on Sunday 26th November. Viewers will have to watch the recap of all the songs before they place their vote on the JESC website. The first round of voting will close at 15:59 CET on Sunday 26th November.

During the live show, the online voting will open again once the last performance has taken place, and will be open for 15 minutes. The final audience result will be a combination of both the pre-show and live voting results. This will then make up 50% of the final vote, with the jury voting being the other 50%.

Categories: ESC Daily

06
October
2017

Think Before Rushing Into Your Eurovision Song Contest Season

Think Before Rushing Into Your Eurovision Song Contest Season

It amazes me how at ease others are slipping into Eurovision mode so early on in the season.

There was a time (maybe ten years or so ago) when Eurovision Song Contest devotees listened to the line-up of songs in each country’s National Final to get their season started in January or February, which at least had the advantage of being in the same calendar year as the Grand Final.

That’s no longer enough. Free on-demand content made available by all the Song Contest broadcasters makes getting your pre-Eurovision fix a relatively straightforward process. Internet distribution helps sate the appetite of a previously under-served audience. Over time the mechanics of the Contest have become must-see entertainment too. As a result, the Eurovision season has expanded.

I resist it. I’ve never wanted to rush the season. No one wants to come to a climax before the main event.

That strategy stems from the songs. Three contrived minutes designed to transport you to an entirely different plane and, depending on the skill of the songwriter and performer, return gently back down to earth. That sort of musical excursion is addictive. Beware the endorphin rush that follows your chosen musical poison – the body does eventually get accustomed.

Vienna 2015 Stage (image: EBU/Thomas Hanses)

Adrenaline given human form, Vienna 2015 (image: EBU/Thomas Hanses)

Avoiding Eurovision Is My Defence Mechanism

In the digital arena’s infancy, behind-the-scenes footage was the must-have for mainstream content producers eager to populate the new and comparatively sparse online platform. Endless videos illustrated the mechanics of television. Forums, blogs, chat rooms, and social media unwittingly powered conversations that saw all of us flirt with the idea of being an indispensable part of the thing we all loved unconditionally.

It still does. It remains a dangerous drug. Be wary.

So, is my leaving Eurovision until the latest possible point a way of avoiding peaking too early, or steering clear of the banal?

Getting hooked up to the Song Contest backbone is the equivalent of turning up in the kitchen when the chef is on the phone ordering the ingredients from the supplier. I don’t really want to be there for the delivery of the order, the binning of the disappointingly rotting produce, nor prepping the vegetables. Let other people do that. I’ll just stand at the pass and marvel at the final creation.

Others, I recognise, are very different. That’s what has consistently made the Contest a valuable eye-opener over the years for me.

Take Lisa-Jayne’s brilliant post about Eurovision start times and why they need to change. A thorough investigation providing insights I hadn’t even realised I wanted or needed to know. I look on such work with a mixture of awe and good-hearted fear. I don’t get anywhere near as engrossed in the Song Contest until the final few weeks. To do that now seems way too early.

Committed ‘proper’ fans (by proper, I mean those who have worked hard to call themselves such, those who know more, and dedicate more of their life to it than I) sit expectantly with mobile phone in their hand or fingers clasping their mouse, waiting for announcements that confirm each broadcaster’s participation in, trial separation, or bitter divorce from the Contest.

This is lore: loyal fans follow the Contest in all its excruciating detail, immersing themselves in the rumour, speculation, or gossip.

Once Eurovision fans, always Eurovision fans. Jedward’s love for Eurovision rubs off on those who may have lost contact through their teenage years (Photo: Ben Robertson)

Friends of mine who work in PR are wary about this. They interpret this kind of passion and commitment as emanating from a vocal and often critical audience, as something that will unseat a well-thought-out plan.

They are right to be afraid. It’s exactly that energy that has in part kept the thing alive. The world of the Eurovision Song Contest is not the place for a mistimed message, nor one that needs to be controlled, restrained, or put to sleep. One false step and disaster could befall you.

In that way, the community lives in a riotous space. Step inside with sturdy boots, an already skinless nose, and shoulders that shrug as reliably as Alan Partridge’s during an uncomfortably boozy lunch.  In that respect, Wogan wasn’t wrong when he described it as a ‘bun-fight’.

Controlling Your Emotions

My wariness of entering the Eurovision world so early in the season may well be because I know my weaknesses.

I can get myself in-deep emotionally quite quickly. The first time I attended (Riga 2003) I was exhausted for a fortnight after it was over. Colleagues at work kept asking me “Are you sure you had a good time?” Wide-eyed and embarrassingly naïve, that exhaustion was the direct result of the extent to which I invested emotionally. Eurovision is a vicious and sadistic taskmaster. Read the warning on the back of the packet: this stuff is dangerous.

But I wonder now whether I envy those who invest so early on in the process.

Maybe my strategy to maintain a healthy distance on proceedings is duff. Maybe those able to casually browse through the early announcements this early on in the season have got things just right. To willingly immerse yourself in the process so early on at the same time as steering clear of the emotional turmoil of the Contest-at-Large is an enviable thing.

Knowing the drug is better than denying yourself.

Isn’t it?

(c) Jon Jacob, thoroughlygood.me.

Categories: ESC Insight

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