31
May
2019

Eurovision 2010 – 2019: The worst scoring countries this decade

Eurovision 2010 – 2019: The worst scoring countries this decade

Michele Perniola & Anita Simoncini (San Marino 2015)

An 11th place to United Kingdom scored in 2011 helps them leave four countries behind them in the list of the worst scoring countries the past ten years. Only twice in the final and an 18th place as best result, San Marino however really needs to improve for the next decade.

Following our article from yesterday about the best scoring half this decade, we now finish with the ones who are ranked from 23rd to 46th.

Just like yesterday, we’ve thrown all the results together this decade and created a ranking for all countries taking part these past ten years. To find out how each country performed at the Eurovision Song Contest, we calculated an Average Relative Position for each country, for every year in the past 10 years. The full calculation method is explained below the list.

As always with calculations like this, they often give some surprising results. We’ll highlight a few of the things we noticed with this ranking of the worst scoring countries this decade:

  • Despite a victory in 2017, Portugal is down at #38. This is due to them only reaching the final on three out of their 8 participations this decade – and of course ending on a 26th place in 2018.
  • United Kingdom didn’t score as low as many fans probably expected. They have four countries, of which three still take part, behind them. In particular Blue’s 11th place in 2011 counts up for United Kingdom.
  • Germany has finished last or second last 4 times this decade, but they also have a win in 2010, and then a 10th, an 8th and finally a 4th place to bring them up the list to #25 – and as such actually quite close to the best scoring half.

Eurovision 2010 – 2019: Worst scoring countries this decade

With appearances from a total of 46 participants this decade, we have divided them into two half’s; best scoring and worst scoring. Yesterday, we brought you the 23 best scoring countries, and today it’s time to look at the worst scoring ones.

RankCountryAverage Relative PositionTimes Participated
24Lithuania61,61%10
25Germany61,75%10
26Israel62,03%10
27Georgia63,99%10
28France64,05%10
29Albania64,56%10
30Malta64,88%10
31Iceland66,92%10
32Poland68,88%8
33Ireland72,21%10
34Belarus73,22%10
35Slovenia74,17%10
36Spain75,09%10
37Switzerland75,23%10
38Portugal75,65%8
39Finland77,16%10
40Croatia79,02%8
41North Macedonia79,28%10
42United Kingdom80,21%10
43Montenegro80,25%8
44Latvia80,85%10
45San Marino85,14%9
46Slovakia92,86%3

These Relative Positions are calculated by dividing a country’s actual position by the lowest possible rank this country could have gotten that year, each minus 1. Semi-final positions are appended to the bottom of the Grand Final scoreboard, in such a way that an 11th position in a Semi-final results in a 27th position. The lowest possible rank in the 2019 first Semi-final would be 35. This would give that particular 11th position a relative rank of 29.41%.

The sum of all relative positions is then divided by the number of times that country took part, to come to the above listed Average Relative Positions. This results in the fairest possible way to compare Semi Final positions against Grand Final positions in the reality of Eurovision where not all countries come from a semi final, and not all semi finals have the same number of participants.

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30
May
2019

Summer Fest in Moldova: Three Eurovision participants and Maruv

Summer Fest in Moldova: Three Eurovision participants and Maruv

Sunstroke project, DoReDos, MARUV and Timebelle

Sunstroke Project, DoReDos, Timebelle and MARUV. Those four well known artists are among the ones to entertain at Summer Fest in Chișinău, Moldova. The festival takes place on the 8th and 9th of June 2019.

If you have a few days off work, and can make it to the Moldovan capital for the 8th and 9th of June, it might be worth getting tickets for the Summer Fest festival. For Eurovision fans, it’s quite an interesting line-up, which features three former participants, one who almost made it, and internationally known DJs.

Tickets can be purchased from 200 lei (42 euros). For many foreigners, accommodation is rather cheap in Moldova. Several airlines operating in Europe fly to KIV, Chișinău International Airport.

Summer Fest 8th of June

First to take the stage after a DJ warm up on the 8th will be the band Timebelle. With the song Apollo they represented Switzerland at the 2017 Eurovision Song Contest. Finishing 12th in their semi-final, they unfortunately didn’t reach the final.

Timebelle will perform a 30 minutes set, and will be followed by another act from Eurovision 2017; local Sunstroke Project. With the song Hey, Mamma! they achieved a great 3rd place at the contest. That placement is Moldova’s best ever Eurovision result. Together with singer Olia Tira, they also took part at the 2010 contest performing Run Away. It was that appearance which gave international fame to their saxophone player Sergey Stepanov, now best known as Epic Sax Guy.

The first day, 8th of June will among others also feature performances from Belarussia rapper CYGO, Lesha Svik, famous French DJ Willy William and local DJ Andrew Rayel who performs at dance festivals all over the world.

See alsoFrom immigrant to top performing artist – Dami Im tells her story

Summer Fest 9th of June

Day two also start with a DJ warm up. First of the acts on stage this day is an instrumental local band 7 Klase. After them, it’s time for another Eurovision participant to entertain the crowd; DoReDos. Their My Lucky Day finished 10th at the final – and will probably for a while be remembered for it’s extraordinary performance.

Ukrainian MARUV will follow after DoReDos. Most Eurovision fans do know her quite well – despite not making it to this year’s contest in Tel Aviv. She won a dramatic national final Vidbir, but refused to sign the contract the broadcaster presented her the next day. After the other national finalists also refused to sign it, Ukrainian broadcaster faced it’s loss and withdrew from the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest.

The second and last day of this Summer Fest also features performances from Russian electronic music producers and DJ’s Filatov & Karas, Russian MATRANG, Moldovan music project Carla’s Dreams where all band member perform anonymously with masks not unlike the one from JOWST (Norway 2017). Russian singer Zivert will close off this festival.

In the video below, you can enjoy a special multi cam video rehearsal from Sunstroke Project at the 2017 Eurovision Song Contest:

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30
May
2019

North Macedonia’s government honours Tamara Todevska for making her country proud

North Macedonia’s government honours Tamara Todevska for making her country proud

Tamara Dodevska and North Macedonia Prime Minister Zoran Zaev

Tamara Todevska and the 7th place she achieved at this year’s Eurovision Song Contest still create headlines in her native country. Today, the government of North Macedonia showed, how much they appreciate her great result by honoring her and her team with a special plaque.

North Macedonia’s Prime Minister Zoran Zaev met today with Tamara Todevska and her team, who represented the country with the new name in Tel Aviv. Zaev thanked the whole team on behalf of himself and on behalf of the government as well as the citizens of North Macedonia for making them all feel proud because of the outstanding performance and the great achievement with the song Proud.

Furthermore, the Prime Minister honored Tamara and her team with a special plaque as an acknowledgment of “North Macedonia’s historic win of the jury vote at the most viewed music event in the world”. In Zaev’s own words, North Macedonia’s performance in Tel Aviv was the main topic of the contest, which was viewed by 200 million people world wide.

According to the press release from the government of North Macedonia, Tamara and her team thanked for the support received. They also talked about all the excitement and expressions from Tel Aviv, they brought with them. They added that the huge support they experienced both before and during the grand final were an additional motivation for delivering a flawless performance and achieving this great success.

Viewers of the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest first saw Tamara finish 8th. A few days later, EBU corrected the result which then placed North Macedonia 7th – and winner of the jury vote.

In the video below, you can see a clip from one of Tamara’s rehearsals at the Eurovision Song Contest:

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30
May
2019

Eurovision 2010 – 2019: The best scoring countries this decade

Eurovision 2010 – 2019: The best scoring countries this decade

Måns Zelmerlöw (Sweden 2015)

With two victories and another five songs in top 5, Sweden is best performing country this past decade. Russia comes in as second. We take a look at how each country have done the past ten editions of the Eurovision Song Contest.

As the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest ended, a whole decade came to an end. For next year’s contest in the Netherlands, we will start a fresh new decade with great entries, controversial victories, fantastic outfits, a whole lot of drama, but also a lot of fun – and we can’t wait for it to begin!

To close this current decade, we’ve thrown all the results together and created a list of the best ranking countries these past ten years. To find out which countries performed best at the Eurovision Song Contest, we calculated an Average Relative Position for each country, for every year in the past 10 years. The full calculation method is explained below the list.

It probably comes as no surprise to many that Sweden is on top, but there are a few more interesting things to pay attention to. We’ll highlight a few here:

  • All three Scandinavian countries (Denmark, Norway and Sweden) are in top 10.
  • Russia, Ukraine, Azerbaijan and Armenia are all to be found in top 15.
  • Turkey comes in as 7th on the list. They did score rather well – until they left after the 2012 contest.
  • Bosnia & Herzegovina participated four times this decade. Their results were good enough to earn them a 12th place.
  • Only 9 out of the 23 best scoring countries in this Eurovision decade participated the maximum 10 times. Another 8 countries have been out one year.
See alsoDiscrepancy between RAI and EBU televote results probably explained

Eurovision 2010 – 2019: Best scoring countries this decade

With appearances from a total of 46 participants this decade, we have divided them into two half’s; best scoring and worst scoring. Below you find the 23 best scoring this decade – and tomorrow, we’ll bring you the remaining countries, who are the in the worst scoring half.

RankCountryAverage Relative PositionTimes participated
1Sweden20,36%10
2Russia24,35%9
3Australia25,05%5
4Italy27,54%9
5Ukraine30,458
6Azerbaijan31,47%10
7Turkey34,41%3
8Denmark42,32%10
9Romania43,11%9
10Norway47,25%10
11Serbia48,24%9
12Bosnia & Herzegovina49,27%4
13Hungary50,50%9
14Armenia51,089
15The Netherlands51,61%10
16Greece52,07%10
17Belgium53,05%10
18Bulgaria55,12%7
19Moldova56,01%10
20Czech Republic58,28%5
21Austria58,43%9
22Cyprus58,79%9
23Estonia61,0210

These Relative Positions are calculated by dividing a country’s actual position by the lowest possible rank this country could have gotten that year, each minus 1. Semi-final positions are appended to the bottom of the Grand Final scoreboard, in such a way that an 11th position in a Semi-final results in a 27th position. The lowest possible rank in the 2019 first Semi-final would be 35. This would give that particular 11th position a relative rank of 29.41%.

The sum of all relative positions is then divided by the number of times that country took part, to come to the above listed Average Relative Positions. This results in the fairest possible way to compare Semi Final positions against Grand Final positions in the reality of Eurovision where not all countries come from a semi final, and not all semi finals have the same number of participants.

Stay tuned as we tomorrow finish this with the 23 worst scoring countries this past decade.

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29
May
2019

Mayor of Amsterdam: We want Eurovision, but not a tough fight

Mayor of Amsterdam: We want Eurovision, but not a tough fight

Amsterdam Rijksmuseum

Amsterdam will be a logic choice to host the 2020 Eurovision Song Contest, Mayor Femke Halsema said. She made it clear that the city is interested in hosting the contest, but that they don’t want to stand in the way of other cities that can do the job.

“We will handle it with respect”. With those words, Mayor of Amsterdam Femke Halsema spoke about their thought’s on hosting next year’s Eurovision Song Contest. She was asked by the party D66, who at a city council meeting said that Amsterdam is the best choice. The Mayor said that she acknowledged that the capital naturally will be a logic option, but also they don’t want to overshadow other cities that might also be able to offer what is needed to be a great Eurovision host city.

Cities interested in hosting the Eurovision Song Contest can now officially work on their bids for the 2020 Eurovision Song Contest. Based on the words from Femke Halsema we can expect Amsterdam to put in a bid, though she doesn’t want to make it all about prestige.

We will deal with it respectfully.

Mayor of Amsterdam, Femke Halsema

The GroenLinks Mayer also mentioned that Amsterdam next year will have Sail – and European Championships taking place, so there is no need for the city to get into a tough battle.

If you want to read more about what is required to host the Eurovision Song Contest, we have put together an article with the requirements a previous host country received from the EBU.

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29
May
2019

Eurovision 2020: Bidding process open – this is what will happen now

Eurovision 2020: Bidding process open – this is what will happen now

Duncan Laurence at Schiphol Airport

Dutch cities interested in hosting the 2020 Eurovision Song Contest can now start to apply. The selection process is expected to take a couple of months. Finding the right host city isn’t an process.

In a joint collaboration between broadcasters NPO, AVROTROS and NOS, the host city search has now officially begun in the Netherlands. Many cities, big and small, have expressed an interest in hosting the 2020 contest, but so far, no one has officially applied. That will change now.

The process consists of three phases:

  • Interested host cities will receive a document with the requirements they need to live up to. It’s not enough to have a large arena, it will need to be able to match requirements for a big TV production like this, space for commentator boxes, green room, working facilities for the delegations, wardrobes etc. They cities will also need to have suitable press facilities and sufficient hotel capacity. We recommend that you check out our previous article for requirements to host a Eurovision Song Contest.
  • The cities who can match the requirements will have four weeks to put together a book which presents their plans and in details describe how they can host the contest. This will need to be officially submitted in the first half of July. We typically see the number of interested cities go down a lot at this step as many realise that they can’t match the requirements.
  • From mid July, the organisers will visit the cities whose plans they want to take a closer look at. They will involve EBU closer in the process at this time. The host city will need to be approved by EBU.

We can probably expect an announcement regarding host city for the 2020 Eurovision Song Contest to come in August or early September depending on how many cities will end up being able to host the contest.

See alsoDuncan Laurence points at Davina Michelle and Naaz as possible Dutch participants for 2020

Previously we put together a list of likely arenas for next year’s contest. They will all be suitable to host the shows, so question is just now; who will officially submit a bid?

In case you already forgot why the Netherlands will host the 2020 Eurovision Song Contest, you can remind yourself of Duncan Laurence’s Arcade in the video below. With that song he won the 2019 contest.

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