01
August
2017

Romania 2018: local press claims national final dates

ROMANIA – Romanian national broadcaster already confirmed their participation in the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest and now local press claims that the national final will take place most likely from 19 of January to 11 of February in the Cluj Napoca’s (Ilinca’s hometown), Sala Polivalenta.

Romania has an amazing top ten finish this year with Yodel It after a tremendous disqualification last year in Stockholm due to financial dispute with the European Broadcasting Union.

It seems that the city has already been approached as the mayor of Cluj Napoca has made a statement saying: “We think that the presence of such a prestigious event in Cluj-Napoca represents one of the most significant ways of promoting our city both at the national and international level.”

The city will dispatch 120,000 Euros for the event as it happened with the NF host cities in 2015 and 2016, Craiova and Baia Mare respectively. Whether there will be semi finals or not it seems that the two parts have discussed booking the date 11th of February as the one for the national final.

source: monitorulcj.ro

Categories: Oiko Times

01
August
2017

Junior Eurovision: Australia takes part in Tbilisi, ABC ME will broadcast the show

Junior Eurovision: Australia takes part in Tbilisi, ABC ME will broadcast the show

Australia will take part in the Junior Eurovision Song Contest for the third time in a row. The show will be broadcast by ABC ME, Australia’s leading broadcast and online TV service for school aged children and their families.

Photo Credits belong to ABC ME.

ABC ME’s popular host, Grace Koh, will attend the event in the Tbilisi Sports Palace in Georgia. On Monday 27 November, she will be joined by Pip Rasmussen and Tim Mathews during the ABC ME broadcast at the family friendly time of 7.30pm. The Grand Final of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest will have taken place a day earlier, on Sunday November 26th, but countries are free to broadcast it at a later timeslot.

Paul Clarke: Adult Eurovision stays with SBS

Paul Clarke, Australia’s Head of Delegation at Eurovision and Director of Blink TV, said. “Eurovision and Junior Eurovision always showcase our Australian singers and songwriters in the most impactful way, and to a huge European audience. This is a very exciting new step in our Eurovision story and we welcome ABC ME and their viewers! We really look forward to working with ABC ME”. Clarke also confirmed that the adult contest will remain at SBS Australia.

David Anderson, ABC Director of Television, said. “We are delighted to be working with SBS, the European Broadcasting Union and production partner Blink TV on such an incredible event. Our channel is able to maximise the reach of the extraordinary contest, while introducing our audience to incredible performers and cultures from across Europe, as well as encouraging them to get behind our Australian contestant.”

Alexa Curtis & Bella Paige

The question remains, however, who this contestant will be. In the past two years, Australia chose for young girls who had previously competed at The Voice Kids. Both Bella Paige and Alexa Curtis came up with some of the more mature JESC-songs. Both their power ballads reached the top 10 of the competition. Alexa Curtis currently holds the honour of Australia’s best JESC result: she finished in fifth place with 202 points.

Categories: ESC Daily

01
August
2017

EBU: Host broadcaster must allow all contestants to perform live

EBU: Host broadcaster must allow all contestants to perform live

Broadcasters hosting the Eurovision Song Contest are from now on obliged to “ensure that all the contestants are able to perform in person live on stage in the shows”. The EBU has stated this in a new set of rules, sent today to the participating broadcasters. These broadcasters are at the same time no longer allowed to send delegation members who “have any antecedents likely to prompt the Host Country’s national authorities to deny them access to the Host Country”.

The new set of rules has been publicly released by the German broadcaster ARD. alterations to the rules are the EBU’s specific answer to the actions of the Ukranian and Russian delegation during this past Eurovision season. In the lead-up to the contest, host country Ukraine made it clear that Russia’s artist Yulia Samoylova was not welcome in Kiev. Russia then withdrew from the contest. Both countries would have been at fault under the new regulations.

The EBU also added several paragraphs about the non-political nature of the competition, which was breached by the actions of both Ukraine and Russia. All participating countries will now have to comply with the non-political nature of Eurovision. Jury members as well have to explicitly promise to be impartial.

Categories: ESC Daily

31
July
2017

Jon Ola Sand: “Choosing host city is one of the most crucial decisions”

Jon Ola Sand: “Choosing host city is one of the most crucial decisions”

The first major step towards the Eurovision Song Contest 2018 has been taken this week, with the choice for Lisbon as the host city for the contest. “Choosing a host city is one of the most crucial decisions to take when it comes to the Eurovision Song Contest,” says Jon Ola Sand, Executive Supervisor of the Eurovision Song Contest. 

“Everything has to be scrutinised, it is not only talking to the city once or twice, you need sit down and negotiate down to the finest detail,” he added. Whilst hosting the Eurovision Song Contest is a logistical and financial challenge, it brings with it huge opportunities. “Hosting the Eurovision Song Contest gives great benefits for the hosting city. It creates a lot of attention around the city name which is spread all over the world. It gives the country and city the possibility to show what it can offer tourists,” said the Norwegian Sand.

What are the basic requirements?

A Host City of the Eurovision Song Contest must meet certain criteria. The venue should accommodate around 10,000 spectators and the city should be within easy reach of an international airport. The location must also have enough hotel accommodation for at least 2,000 delegates, accredited journalists and spectators.

“You need a good international airport, a central hub to fly people in and out of the city, and a city that provides good infrastructure. You also need a suitable venue that can accommodate around 10.000 spectators,” explained Jon Ola. “You also need a press centre for 1,500 journalists and good facilities there for the delegates. You also need good hotels, in different areas of the city in different price categories,” he added.

Categories: ESC Daily

30
July
2017

Junior Eurovision 2017: what we know so far

GEORGIA – Although the team of oikotimes.com is not intending to cover the event closely this year, we have prepared for you a recap of what we know so far for the 2017 Junior Eurovision Song Contest, an event which will be marking its 15th edition this year in Tbsilisi, the capital of Georgia. The show will take place on November 26th and it will be themed as “Shine Bright”.

As of 29 July 2017, twelve countries have announced their provisional participation in the contest. Albania, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Ireland, Italy, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Malta, The Netherlands, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine.

Despite winning the contest three times it’s the first time Georgia is hosting the event. Host city and venue announced on February 26th and March 16th respectively: Tbilisi Sports Palace will welcome the kids on late November. Georgia was the first country asked to host the event as rightful winner of the 2016 Junior Eurovision edition, a feature introduced since 2013.

On 12 May 2017, the host broadcaster Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB) and the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) confirmed the contest slogan as “Shine Bright” for the 2017 edition, during a press conference held at the International Exhibition Centre, in Kiev, Ukraine – hosts of the Eurovision Song Contest 2017. Details of the visual design and logo were also released during the conference.

Despite not covering as closely as the previous years the event, we plan to have a series of posts informing you about participations and preparations and of course our annual Junior Europrediction poll which will kick off during the rehearsals week.

WHAT ABOUT THE OTHER COUNTRIES

  • Austria – The Austrian national broadcaster, ORF, announced on 31 May 2017 that they would not be debuting in the Junior Eurovision Song Contest in 2017, with no intention to participate for the next few years.
  • Belgium – The Belgian national broadcaster, Vlaamse Radio- en Televisieomroeporganisatie (VRT), announced on 30 May 2017 that they would not be making a return to the Junior Eurovision Song Contest in 2017.
  • Bulgaria – On 23 May 2017, Bulgarian national broadcaster, Bulgarian National Television (BNT), confirmed participation in the 2017 contest. However, on 7 June 2017, it was revealed that due to the election of the company’s new Director-General, that the broadcaster had withdrawn its application. Once the Director-General has been elected, BNT will then decide whether or not they shall participate in the 2017 contest.
  • Croatia – The Croatian national broadcaster, Hrvatska radiotelevizija (HRT), has confirmed that the broadcaster is looking at the possibility of returning to Junior Eurovision this year. The broadcaster has yet to make a final decision on participation, with the deadline for countries to sign up for this years competition expected to be in September.
  • Cyprus – On 27 September 2016, Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation (CyBc) became the first broadcaster to announce their intention to participate in the 2017 edition. However, on 8 June 2017, CyBC revealed that they had not yet decided whether or not they would participate.
  • Denmark – On 2 June 2017, it was revealed that both Danish member broadcasters of the EBU, DR and TV 2, had declined to take part in the 2017 edition.
  • Estonia – On 25 June 2017, it was revealed that the Estonian national broadcaster, Eesti Rahvusringhääling (ERR), would not be making their debut at the contest.
  • Finland – On 26 May 2017, it was revealed that the Finnish broadcaster, Yle, would not make their debut in the 2017 edition.
  • Hungary – On 13 July 2017, Hungarian national broadcaster Médiaszolgáltatás-támogató és Vagyonkezelő Alap (MTVA) seems that they would not rule out a debut at the 2017 contest, but they may take a decision in the later days. On 17 July 2017, MTVA announced that they will decide whether or not Hungary will participate in the 2017 contest by the end of July. On 25 July 2017, MTVA announced that they will not be making their debut in the 2017 edition.
  • Iceland – On 27 June 2017, Icelandic national broadcaster RÚV announced that they would not be making their debut at the 2017 contest.
  • Latvia – On 19 May 2017, the national broadcaster Latvijas Televizija (LTV), announced that they would not return in the 2017 edition.
  • Lithuania – On 12 July 2017, the national broadcaster Lithuanian National Radio and Television (LRT), announced that they would not return in the 2017 contest.
  • Poland – Polish broadcaster Telewizja Polska (TVP), have expressed their interest in the 2017 contest, but has yet to publicly confirm their participation.
  • Slovenia – On 18 May 2017, the national broadcaster Radiotelevizija Slovenija (RTV SLO), announced that they would not return in the 2017 edition.
  • Spain – On 3 July 2017, the national broadcaster Radiotelevisión Española (TVE), announced that they would not return in the 2017 edition.
  • Sweden – On 24 May 2017, the Swedish broadcaster Sveriges Television (SVT), announced that they would not return in the 2017 edition.
  • Switzerland – On 22 May 2017, the Italian language broadcaster Radiotelevisione svizzera (RSI), announced that they would not return in the 2017 edition. However, Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen (SRF), Radio Télévision Suisse (RTS), and Radiotelevisiun Svizra Rumantscha (RTR); which are broadcasters of the Swiss Broadcasting Corporation (SRG SSR) have not announced their plans on participation.
  • United Kingdom – ITV) ruled out a return to the contest on 25 May 2017, despite previous rumours of a return due to the network’s production of The Voice Kids UK. However, the remaining British broadcasters, the BBC, Channel 4, and Wales’ S4C, which are eligible to take over the responsibility of the UK’s participation, have not released any statements regarding a return to the contest.
  • Australia – Australian public broadcaster, Special Broadcasting Service (SBS), announced on 29 March 2017 that a decision on continued participation at Junior Eurovision will be made later in the year.
  • Israel – The Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA) shut down on 9 May 2017. The new broadcasting networks Israeli Public Broadcasting Corporation and “KAN” are not members of the EBU which is a requirement to take place in the contest Although the IPBC is expected to apply for EBU membership, they lack a news division which is a requirement for an EBU membership. It was revealed on 6 July 2017 that an agreement had been signed between the EBU and IPBC, allowing the broadcaster to participate in EBU contests such as the Junior Eurovision Song Contest, despite not having full membership.

source: wikipedia.org

Categories: Oiko Times

30
July
2017

Eurovision in Concert 2018 to be held on 14th of April

Eurovision in Concert 2018 to be held on 14th of April

The tenth edition of Eurovision in Concert will take place on the 14th of April. The event that hosts several artists that take part in the upcoming Eurovision Song Contest will once again be held in Amsterdam.

This year a record 35 acts from the 2017 Eurovision Song Contest performed at Eurovision in Concert in Amsterdam, far exceeding last year’s record of 26.

Eurovision in Concert, an initiative by a group of Dutch Eurovision fans, will be organised for the 10th consecutive year. The event has become the leading promotional event prior to the Eurovision Song Contest and is endorsed by the EBU.

Categories: ESC Daily

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